Solaah Shringaar-Bicchiya

Known as Bicchiya in the North or Metthi in the South toe rings have been worn by Indian women since the ancient ages.Most Indian women who are married wear a toe-ring. It’s not only a sign that the woman is married, it’s also science. They are usually made of silver and worn in pairs (unlike the trend in Western countries, where they are worn singly or in unmatched pairs) on the second toe of both feet.
image

Indian Vedas (Vedham or Vedam) say that by wearing this in both feet, it is believed, that their Menstrual cycle course is regularized with even intervals. This gives good scope for conceiving to married women. Also it is said just because that particular nerve in the second finger from toe, also connects the uterus and passes through heart. If you notice, the toe ring will always be on the second toe of the right leg and also the left leg.

image

It will control the uterus and keep it healthy by producing evenly balanced blood pressure to the uterus. As Silver being a good conductor, it also absorbs the energy from the polar energies from the earth and passes it to the body, thus refreshing whole body system.
Traditionally they are quite ornate, though more contemporary designs are now being developed to cater to the modern bride.
image

Some ‘bichiya sets’ may have pairs for four of the five toes, excluding the little pinky. ‘Bichiyas’ may not be made of gold, as gold holds a ‘respected’ status and may not be worn below the waist by Hindus, but this is not followed very strictly and toe rings made of gold and diamonds are commonly seen.

image

In great Indian epic called ‘Ramayana’ toe ring plays a vital role. When Sita was abducted by Ravana, on the way, she throwed her toe ring (kaniazhi) as the identification for lord Rama. This shows that toe ring is used from ancient time.Toe rings were introduced to the United States by Marjorie Borell who, after returning from India began manufacturing and selling them in New York in 1973. Her first retail outlet was Fiorucci, a trendy fashion retailer located on 59th Street in New York.

image

Solaah Shringar-Mangalsutra

Traditionally, there are five signs of marital status of women, according to Hindu culture-mangalsutra, toe rings, kumkum, bangles and a nose ring. Talking about Mangalsutra, the word denotes a significant meaning. While mangal means aupiscious, sutra can be deciphered as a thread.It is a sacred necklace that the groom ties around the bride’s neck on the day of the wedding in a ceremony called Mangalya dharanam (meaning – wearing the auspicious), thereby giving her the status of his wife and life mate. Thereafter, the wife wears the mangalsutra all her life or till the time the husband is alive as a sign of their marriage, mutual love and goodwill, understanding and faithful commitment to one another.

image
The mangalsutra, worn by most married Hindu women across India, is known differently in different parts of the country – ‘thaali’, ‘thaaly’, ‘pustelu’, ‘maangalyam’ or ‘mangalsutram’ in the southern states of India and ‘mangalsutra’ in the northern states. Each black bead in the mangalsutra is believed to have divine powers that protect the married couple from the evil eye and is believed to safeguard the life of the husband. Hindu women are extremely superstitious about the mangalsutra.

image
If it breaks or gets lost it is considered ominous. Therefore, the Mangalsutra is much more than a piece of fancy jewelry, but a sacred necklace of love, trust and marital happiness of a Hindu couple – a vital symbol of wedlock.

image
Today, the concept of wearing a mangalsutra has changed considerably. It is more of a fashion statement than a symbol of marriage, thanks to modernization. With the progressive times, the wearing of mangalsutra in working women has considerably reduced.

image
There is also a marked change in the style and making of mangalsutra over the years. Previously, women used to wear simple design mangalsutra, with small pendants, but now, the trend is to wear short length ones, that too with a single string.

image
Instead of gold pendants, they prefer diamond ones. However, the black beads have still managed to remain constant. Whatever may be the reason to adore it, mangalsutra surely symbolizes the real essence and concept of a Hindu marriage.

image

Solah Shringar- Chura

Wedding is like a charm for every girl I think..! The sensation of wedding makes you happy, the makeover and accessories are hot craze for every girl. Specially wearing Chura is on top demand.With the initial thought of wedding in specially in North Indian tradition Chura is first accessory which comes in mind with your wedding dress selection. I have always been fascinated by them, just love the way they look.
image
image

Wearing a choora, after marriage, has become more like a fashion these days, irrespective of the prevalence of this custom in their religion or not. People have now-a-days started considering Choora bangles as a symbol of a married woman. Even with the changing times, where, women do not prefer wearing mangalsootra and sindur, after marriage, they take immense pride in showing off their choora. My muslim friend went against her family to adorn the chura for her nikah. She wore it for 40 days all because it looked pretty and stated her married status.
image
The bridal chura is worn to signify a woman’s newly married status. Some say that the bride doesn’t have to do housework while the bracelets are on, I have seen my maami and maasi’s being told not to work until mehendi and chura were removed how nice right? ( i hope my inlaws are reading )
image
Actually, the ritual of choora has its traditional roots in the Punjabi culture, where the maternal uncle of the bride, on the day of the marriage, performs this custom of making his niece wear the wedding choora. The choora or the wedding bangles is first washed in milk, and the bride cannot see her choora before wearing it. These days, the design of the choora is first selected by would- be bride, after which a different set of the same design is worn by her on the day of her wedding.
image
image
The traditional period of wearing a choora is the starting one year of her married life, but these days, girls wear them as long as they wish, due to their liking towards it. There are different set and designs available in the market, which vary in their colour, maroon and white being the base, and the count can vary from 21, 31 to 51, bangles in a set, as per the choice of the bride. Simple chura is now become the designer chura the simple red, maroon ad white bangle is now in new avatar with the spectacular stone work, latest trendy designs
While a simple chura would cost between 2000-4000 RS, a fancy chura with all the bling and swaroski would easily cost up 15-20,000 RS.
image
image

Kalire !

The sweet moments of wedding are not only unforgettable for the bride and the groom but also for the near and dear ones. One such moment is the chuda ceremony which is celebrated at bride’s place just a day before the wedding. Once the chuda has been worn, the bride’s friends and cousins tie Kalire to the chuda. Kaliras (or known as kalire) are ornaments worn on the hands of Punjabi brides. While this is traditionally a Punjabi wedding custom, most brides these days opt to wear them thanks to our bolly movies.
image
They hang like beautiful chandeliers and come in a range of colors to match any outfit.These are pieces of umbrella shaped gold or silver ornaments. These signify good wishes for the bride’s new life ahead and are also meant to remind her of her friends and cousins. It is said that the number of leaves on kalire are as many as bride’s friends. Kalire’s are encrusted with dried coconut and dried beetle nuts.
image
image
image
I absolutely love the way they look, needless to say the logo shows my love for kalira’s. There’s an interesting ritual associated with kalire. The bride shakes her hands over heads of all the unmarried girls in the family one by one and if a leaf or a part of kalira falls on anybody’s head, then it is believed that she will be the next one to get married.
image
image
So what happens to these post the wedding? Usually the couple visits the temple/gurudwara the morning after the wedding to take blessing this is where the bride leaves one of her kalira’s and the other is stored with the bride a momento. My mom still has her kalira’s and I plan to use it for my wedding, incorporate it in my phoolon ki chaadar how kool right? Here’s another way of storing them and keeping those wedding memories fresh
image

Where to buy these? while finding them in Dubai will be a task they are readily available in India. The best ones are offcourse from Amritsar, Gandhi Market in Mumbai is another great place to buy these from or infact buy anything typically Punjabi.
image image
Having difficulties getting hold of some Kalira’s? contact us and we’ll have them shipped to you!

Solaah Shringar- Nath

Nath or Nathni is almost synonymous with bridal wear as generally it’s worn only on weddings these days! The word ‘Nath’ is derived from HindI word “Naath”, meaning husband or master.
As per old tradition on the wedding night the groom removes the ‘Nath’ to show a sign of the ending of virginity ‘Nath-Utarna’. In the past, it was said that a single, unmarried girls or widowed woman could not wear the Nath. But nowadays at any cultural function, wedding ceremony or religious festival, women of all ages can be seen with these nose dazzlers without regard of her marital status.
image
The Nath has become an essential part of trousseau of married women and women of different cultures adorn different styles of them.
image
In the Punjabi culture the Nath is gifted by the Maama of the bride along with her chhoda and kalire. Here’s a pic of my Nath umm yes I already have it, my Maama was kind enough to have gifted me this post graduation.
image image

Nath for all the Marathi Mulgi’s
Styled in the shape of the number “9” and studded with translucent pearls, this symbol of old-world charm has long been an essential part of a bride’s trousseau, often being passed down as family heirloom.
image image

image image

Solaah Shringar- Maang Tikaa

Maang tika as the name suggests is a piece of jewellery worn for the forehead. It adds the perfect ethnic touch and completes solah shringar of the bride.This beautiful piece of jewellery hangs from the forehead and is worn to accentuate the bride’s beauty.
image
The types of maang tikkas vary from state to state in India. Maang tikka, according to the ancient Hindu culture is not just an adornment but it is a symbol of uniting the male and female for the rest of their life. A golden maang tikka consists of a beautifully designed pendent attached to a chain that has a hook at the other end. The chain and the hook,hold the tikka on the forehead, exactly at the place where it sits on the ‘AgyaChakra’ or the sixth chakra of the bride, that stands for preservation and control of emotions and concentration.
image
The styles of the maang tikka range from very simple to heavy ones, which may differ from each other due to different communities. While for a Hindu bride, the Maang tikka is in the form of a pendant, which dangles on the center of the forehead, on the other hand a Muslim bride, adorns her hair with a Jhoomer style maang tikka.
image

Another type of maang tikka is the “MatthaPatti” which is particularly designed to adorn a bride’s look. This heavy maang tikka consist two extra chains on each side, which completes the glittering look of a bride.
image image
image
image

The Rajput women wore Bor or Borla, the traditional Rajasthani maang tikka, in the old times. Even today, it is very common to see a married Rajasthani woman wearing this on a regular day. This type of maang tikka is spherical which makes it tricky, to stay put.
image
image

Jhoomer or Paasa is a very important ornament worn by any Muslim bride. This is a fan shaped tikka, which is placed on the side of the hair unlike the other types of tikkas. Gold and pearls are mainly used to design this unusual style of Jhoomer.
image
image

image

The Shringar Patti is different from the Mattha Patti in the way that it has more than one side panel. This “Maang Tika” looks absolutely exquisite with several types of hair style, but the catch is that it needs extra help to be secured in place.
image
I’m simply a fan of the usual Maang tikka i feel the mattha patti makes a person look chubby as it accentuates your face and makes it look more round.Here’s a pic of the Maang tikka i chose for myself not really for the wedding probably for the Mehendi function or mata ki chowki.

Kundan vs Polki

Kundan vs Polki

Indian jewellery is renowned all over the world for its grandeur and artistic designs. There are many different works or forms of jewellery in India of which Kundan and Polki seem to be timeless because of their craze among people, especially brides.
image

Kundan and Polki jewellery that look very similar when one tries to look at images using Google. However they differ alot in terms of price and content I myself only realised this when I purchased a polki set for my soon to be mum in law.
image
Kundan
Kundan jewellery is perhaps the oldest form of gold jewellery made in India. Kundan jewellery reached its pinnacle during the times of Mughal Emperors.This jewellery remains as timeless as ever, and its craze among brides has to be seen to be believed. Kundan is basically a method to set gemstones in gold jewellery. For this, the specialist inserts make use of a gold foil that is inserted in between the gems and the mount over which gems get studded. Specialists who make Kundan jewellery are called Kundan Saaz.
image image
image

image
Polki
Polki is a type of gold jewellery that makes use of uncut diamonds. The special feature of this jewellery lies in the fact that there is gold foil at the back that has been painted to place the diamonds in between. With uncut diamond reflecting light, Polki jewellery looks irresistible for most women. With celebrities like Ashwarya Rai and Shilpa Shetty wearing Polki jewellery in recent times, the popularity of this jewellery has received a tremendous boost. . Being comparatively less expensive than diamonds, Polki enthuses women to opt for large, chunky pieces. In fact, it is a popular option for those who have limited budget, yet want a substantial addition to their jewellery collection.
image
There is a whole range of Polki jewellery out there in the market and the price of a set can vary from Rs.3 lakh to Rs.3 crore, depending upon the quality and design. The cost of a polki set often goes up mainly because of the use of pure gold and precious stones.”
image
image
What is the difference between Kundan and Polki?
• Polki jewellery is more expensive than Kundan jewellery.
• Polki makes use of uncut diamonds whereas Kundan makes use of glass imitations.
• Polki is an option for those who want the splendor of diamonds but cannot afford pure diamond jewellery.
• While the word Polki was initially used for uncut diamonds, it gradually came to be used for Kundan jewellery, whereas Kundan started to be applied to gold jewellery made with glass imitations.
image
Well the good part about this is you could opt for a cheaper Kundan set that actually looks chunky if you don’t want to spend alot on the wedding jewellery. Jewellery in the Indian household has always looked onto as an investment so depending upon your budget you could opt for either of the two.